Tag Archives: harry goaz

Eerie, Indiana 1.17 – The Loyal Order of Corn

Here’s another example of Eerie, Indiana acknowledging its roots. One of the characters in tonight’s episode is a space traveller who’s been disguised as an ordinary American since he showed up on our planet in Siberia in 1908. Who better to cast than My Favorite Martian star Ray Walston?

The Loyal Order of Corn is Eerie’s fraternal lodge, their version of the Knights of Columbus, Water Buffalo, or Stonecutters. I gave our son a quick introduction about these fellows (including Harry Goaz in his last fleeting appearance as the town cop) having fun and enjoying secret handshakes and making Steve Guttenberg a star before getting started. The episode gives Jason Marsden’s character a name, Dash-X, which he likes better than Plus-Minus, as those are the symbols on his hands. Unfortunately, the revamped title sequence that they introduced with episode 15 gives away Ray Walston’s character having the same symbols on his own hands, but happily he doesn’t reveal their meaning to Dash-X before departing.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under eerie indiana

Eerie, Indiana 1.13 – Tornado Days

NBC originally ordered thirteen episodes of Eerie, Indiana. If they hadn’t extended the show with a late order for six more, then the series would have ended with this magnificently silly installment. Most right-thinking people agree that Eerie‘s eventual final episode would be as triumphant as a final episode can be, but had it ended here, I’d still argue in its favor. “Tornado Days” is incredibly fun and weird.

The story’s built around a local superstition that a tornado that tends to spring up every year like clockwork is in fact the same tornado. Its name is Old Bob. Further, local lore has it that Old Bob won’t actually strike Eerie if everybody attends the annual Tornado Day Picnic. But Marshall decides to buck the trend because he thinks it’s stupid. And because he’s been afraid of tornadoes since he saw The Wizard of Oz as a child.

But the superstition is true. Old Bob is alive, and Old Bob really gets pissed off by Marshall skipping out on his picnic. So when Matt Frewer, playing one of those roles that Matt Frewer was born to play, gets dumped into Eerie with a recording of Old Bob’s winds translated into speech, everybody’s in for a big surprise.

Everybody else in town gets ushered into the World o’ Stuff as the storm looms. This is the final appearance of Archie Hahn as Mr. Radford, and he gets a last gag with Sgt. Knight, wondering whether they might appease Old Bob by sacrificing Syndi! Fortunately, it doesn’t come to that.

Much to our son’s displeasure, we’re going to pause there for a few weeks to keep things fresh, but we’ll be back in Eerie, Indiana in April for the last six episodes. Stay tuned!

Leave a comment

Filed under eerie indiana

Eerie, Indiana 1.12 – Marshall’s Theory of Believability

There’s a delightful in-joke in this episode. A con artist calling himself Professor Zircon brings his traveling Museum of the Parabelievable to Eerie and boasts that among his other accomplishments, he has regularly appeared on The Tonight Show. It’s true that Johnny Carson did have a number of… well, let’s just call them flim-flam men on his program, Uri Geller possibly being the highest profile one. And Carson would give them enough rope to hang themselves. More often, Carson would invite James Randi on his show to debunk the claims of so-called psychics and magicians. Professor Zircon wouldn’t last five minutes against the Amazing Randi.

Naturally, Zircon has a con in mind for Eerie, a scheme involving some space junk crashing in the woods outside town. But the “professor” hadn’t reckoned on Eerie being a little more weird than he had in mind!

Leave a comment

Filed under eerie indiana

Eerie, Indiana 1.3 – The ATM With the Heart of Gold

Our son is loving this show, and tells us that every episode is better than the previous one. He particularly loved this installment, in which an ATM with an interface that’s somewhere between Max Headroom and Steve Urkel gives all the money from every account in the Eerie Savings & Loan as a gift to his “friend,” Simon, which causes instant bankruptcy for everybody in town. The episode actually makes a passing reference to the then-ongoing Savings and Loan Crisis, but Eerie’s so weird that not even the FDIC will insure the bank’s depositors.

This episode is the first one to visit Eerie’s general store and soda fountain, the World o’ Stuff, and introduces a recurring character, the shop’s proprietor Mr. Radford, played by Archie Hahn. Or at least we think he’s Mr. Radford. He might be in the witness protection program… or he might be something even stranger.

Leave a comment

Filed under eerie indiana