Tag Archives: dan berlinka

Thunderbirds are Go 2.23 – Long Haul

A boatload of suspension of disbelief is always required in the world of International Rescue, but boy, this one takes the cake! I’m not sure whether it’s “everything being backwards compatible with everything else,” as Marie put it, or Thunderbird 2 flying into space, or the preparations to get it into space taking maybe an hour, two at the most. But our son loved this story by Dan Berlinka without any silly grownup reservation. There’s a gag about pizza delivery that had him in stitches, but he was so impressed by the wide-eyed glorious ridiculousness of this story that it could have been made without any jokes and he’d have been completely satisfied.

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Thunderbirds are Go 2.12 – Fight or Flight

“Look up!” Our son absolutely loved this one. I know I say that a lot, but this time he was so excited he was slapping out a drum beat on his knees. It’s the one about a runaway cargo zeppelin that’s rapidly losing altitude and bound for a big Australian city. There’s a malfunctioning loading claw inside that’s got two people trapped, and the rescue requires Kayo to put on one of those big exoskeletons like Ripley used in Aliens.

This is the second script for the show by Dan Berlinka, who wrote “Tunnels of Time” in the first series. He has a lot of fun with Brains trying to focus on the problem while battling zero-gravity “spacesickness.” I enjoyed the heck out of this, but not even close to how much our son did.

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Thunderbirds are Go 1.9 – Tunnels of Time

This show uses an awful lot more one-off writers than I would have guessed. This one’s by Dan Berlinka, who writes the online CBBC tween show Dixi and has contributed to quite a few British kids’ programs, like Shaun the Sheep. It’s a search through an ancient pyramid, with all the traps and narrow escapes that you’d expect from something like this. Gordon, Lady Penelope, and Parker are stuck inside it, with an obnoxiously obvious villain declining to call for help.

Daniel had never seen anything like this before, and he watched with intense curiosity as the heroes looked for a way out of the tomb. He enjoyed it, but what he liked most was the introductory sequence, set five months before the action, when Thunderbird 2 unwittingly discovers the tomb. The vehicles are always going to win in a kids’ affection, you know.

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