Doctor Who: The Enemy of the World (part four)

In the 1990s, some enterprising fans began taking the audio from all the missing episodes of Doctor Who and marrying it to whatever visuals were available. These included a few surviving clips, publicity photos, and “telesnaps” that an entrepreneur named John Cura was taking with a special camera – about three shots a minute – in order to sell to directors and actors who wanted a visual record of their work in the days before home video. These reconstructions are amazing, but they’re not really for me. I’d really rather not experience TV in that way, even if it’s all that’s available. (We are going to watch one next week, though.)

I certainly had friends in the nineties who collected these reconstructions all the same, and one of them was kind of overbearing in his insistence that I spend time watching them with him. I declined, and when I first saw this story a couple of years ago, I was so very glad that I did. See, I’ve only paid the smallest attention to the plot details of the missing stories, and so I had no idea about the spectacular twist at the climax of this episode. In a program as documented and discussed and blogged about and written about and rewritten about, there are not very many surprises left.

In fact, I enjoyed this so much that I’m not going to mention in this blog where exactly Salamander goes for his cigar breaks.

When I was writing about “The Power of the Daleks,” I mentioned that it was common in the sixties for the regular actors to get occasional vacation weeks in the middle of a serial. Part four of “Enemy” is unique in that both Frazer Hines and Deborah Watling are absent; their characters Jamie and Victoria are Salamander’s prisoners. The guest cast began shrinking last week when George Pravda and David Nettheim’s characters were killed. Carmen Munroe’s character also dies in this episode, but Milton Johns and a squad of “guard” bullies take center stage.

Unfortunately, the guards would need to be replaced by Daleks or something to stir our son back into enjoying this story more. “This is not very cool,” he has pronounced. I think he’s wrong, but you can tell that all the Supermarionation shows that he’s enjoyed have had quite an impact when he grumbles “I wish this had some explosions in it.”

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under doctor who

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s