Batman 2.3 – Hot Off the Griddle

WOW! This episode is completely terrific. Man alive, is it ever entertaining. I mean, you know it must be a winner if I’m passing up a perfectly reasonable opportunity to post a sexy photo of Julie Newmar in favor of something from this amazing scene in which our heroes visit the new, happening nightclub, where the latest crazy dance, the catusi, had been popularized on record by Benedict Arnold and the Traitors. So let’s hear it for Aunt Harriet, supporting local music. You just know she’s a sponsor of the local university’s college radio station. (Save WRAS.)

The specials at this club, our hostess tells us, include catburgers and chicken cacciatore. I just love this scene. It’s got totally with-it and hip kids from 1966 dancing to this twangy guitar songs, and it looks exactly like a scene from 1970’s Beyond the Valley of the Dolls. I said that to myself and totally did not recognize Batman and Robin’s hostess. It’s Edy Williams! Sheer perfection.

Anyway, so I had this little hypothesis that since the Batman movie was originally planned to precede the series, even though circumstances required it to be filmed and released after season one, the narrative still takes place before episode one. That seems to be borne out here. There was the odd continuity error of Batman not recognizing Miss Kitka as Catwoman, but it makes sense if the movie is actually the first time he saw her without a mask. That’s borne out here, as Gordon refers to her as coming back from the dead, as we saw in her previous television appearance.

Daniel really started wondering about the books on the shelf that slides back to reveal the batpoles. He wondered what would happen if you had your hand there and the shelf slid back. He was still asking about that during the “what can all these clues mean” scene in the commissioner’s office.

But I said that this was entertaining, and that’s got to be for more than one mod scene, a continuity fill, and Daniel’s curiosity. Okay, for starters, Jack Kelly – Brother Bart Maverick himself!! – appears in a small role as an oddball gossip columnist whose office is a phone booth in a drug store, and he’s hilarious. Batman doesn’t want to have lunch with such a disreputable character, and even after the reporter betrays Batman to the villainess, she shoots him down too. “Nobody wants to eat with me,” he grumbles. I died. It’s an example of the absurdly witty dialogue by Stanley Ralph Ross, which probably reaches its apex when Robin, roasting on a butter-smeared griddle in the baking Gotham sun, whimpers “Holy oleo,” and Catwoman replies “I didn’t know you could yodel.”

But to be clear, this really appears to be a case where Newmar watched Lee Meriwether in the movie and said to herself that the gauntlet had been thrown. Catwoman is now in full dominatrix mode, and purring how sad it is that she and Batman are on opposite sides of the law. It’s a particular shame, since Batman’s such a he-man, and she’s had to turn down offers from the Joker (“green hair”) and the Penguin (“too short”). It’s also the first time that she finds a way to dismiss Robin as just being a teenager. Forty million people watched this episode in 1966 and lit a cigarette when it finished.

Daniel, of course, sees none of this. He’s four. Catwoman’s just mean.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Batman 2.3 – Hot Off the Griddle

  1. If I remember right, Catwoman’s line about Penguin was even better than that: “And the Penguin’s too *small* for me…”

    One has to wonder how many parents back in 1967 were chortling into their hands…

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